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Word List

This word list provides guidance on how, when, and whether to use specific words, as well as guidance on capitalization for product-specific terms.


WordDescription
aboveAvoid using directional language. It's confusing when read by a screenreader and is difficult for localization.
activeAvoid. Use 'on' or 'live' instead.
activateAvoid. Use 'turn on' or 'enable' instead.
addUse when the action is truly additive or the item is being added to a container (list, group, etc.). For generating something, use 'create'.
adminSounds friendlier, less formal than 'administrator'
appUse instead of 'application' - simpler, more widely used.
backUse for a process or workflow to refer moving backwards.
belowAvoid using directional language. It's confusing when read by a screenreader and is difficult for localization.
bugExcept for referencing the debugger, characterize as an 'issue'. Not all users may know what a bug is.
buttonJust refer to the name of the button, don't refer to the fact that it's a button. For example, 'Select Start' instead of 'Select the Start button'
cancelUse for stopping a process or workflow, where there's no expectation that the user would want to save their work.
chooseAvoid. Use 'select'.
clearUse for removing filters, deselecting checkboxes, etc.
clickAvoid. Use 'select'. Not all users use a mouse.
cloneAvoid. Use 'copy' or 'duplicate' depending on context.
closeUse for dismissing a modal or window, or in situations where the user would want to save their work.
confirmAvoid if possible. Try something friendlier like 'make sure' or 'check'
continueAvoid in workflows. Use 'next' instead.
copyUse when allowing user to copy content and use elsewhere.
createUse to refer to generating something new. Don't use 'new'.
deactivateAvoid. Use 'turn off' or 'disable' instead.
debuggerDo not capitalize. This is a generic term and not something specific to our product suite.
deleteUse when the action is permanent and the item is unretrievable.
deselectAvoid. It's difficult to translate and can be confusing. Use 'clear' or 'clear all' instead.
disableUse when referring to the action of making a feature unavailable or not operational. This is a more technical word, so consider content best practices (simple words!) and your audience. Use less technical words like 'off' or 'turn off' if it won't hinder comprehension or accuracy, or if you're writing for a less technical audience (like marketers).
disabledUse for conveying a status where the entity or feature is preventing a broader feature to function. This is a more technical word that could be perceived as jargon, so consider content best practices (simple words!) and your audience. Use the less technical term 'off' if it won't hinder comprehension or accuracy, or if you're writing for a less technical audience (like marketers).
dismissAvoid. Use 'close' instead.
doneAvoid. Use 'finish' or 'close' instead, depending on the use case. Actions more closely describe what will happen when the user clicks the button.
downloadUse as a call to action when a user need to copy data from Twilio to a computer system
duplicateUse when allowing user to create a replica of an existing item.
easy / easilyAvoid. This contains a value judgement and can make users feel dumb if it doesn't feel easy to them.
editUse when referring to changing or updating a specific feature or item. For example, you can edit a tracking plan or edit a dashboard. If referring to more global controls, like permissions, access, or admin features, use 'manage'.
e.g.Avoid. Some people don't understand what they mean, and they're hard to translate. Use 'For example' instead.
enableUse when referring to the action of making a feature available or operational. This is a more technical word, so consider content best practices (simple words!) and your audience. Use less technical words like 'on' or 'turn on' if it won't hinder comprehension or accuracy, or if you're writing for a less technical audience (like marketers). For example, using 'enable' is appropriate in relation to a reverse ETL model. You can enable the model, but the reverse ETL process is not fully on. Multiple other reverse ETL features also need to be working for the entire process to happen. Avoid this word when describing benefits of a product. Instead describe what the user can accomplish. For example, instead of 'Journeys enables you to personalize experiences,' try 'Personalize the customer experience with...'.
enabledUse for conveying a status where an entity/feature is allowing the broader feature to function. This is a more technical word that could be perceived as jargon, so consider content best practices (simple words!) and your audience. Use the less technical term 'on' if it won't hinder comprehension or accuracy, or if you're writing for a less technical audience (like marketers).
enterUse to instruct / describe putting information into a field. Avoid 'type' since not everyone is typing.
etc.Avoid. Some people don't understand what latin abbreviations mean, and they're hard to translate.
exitAvoid. Unique to Windows. Use 'close' or 'cancel', depending on the situation.
exportUse as a CTA when a user needs to transfer data from a Twilio product and convert it into a different format.
i.e.Avoid. Some people don't understand what latin abbreviations mean, and they're hard to translate. Use 'that is' instead.
importUse as a call to action when a user needs to transfer data and convert it into a different format so it can be used in a Twilio product.
inactiveAvoid. Use 'off' or 'disabled' instead.
in order toAvoid. Just say 'to'.
infoSounds friendlier and less formal than 'information.' Consider using 'information' in more serious situations, like privacy or legal contexts.
invalidAvoid if possible. This is fairly technical term. Use 'wrong', 'not working', 'not right', or another less technical expression. Ideally, you can explain what's actually wrong with the code, input, etc.
launchAvoid. If you're referring to an app or a feature, use 'open.' If you're referring a workflow or process, use 'start'.
liveUse for features that are performing a function on an ongoing, constant basis. For example, to describe a journey that is currently running or an audience that is continuously computing.
leverageAvoid. Use 'use' instead.
log in / loginAvoid. Use 'sign in' or 'sign-in'. These terms are more frequently searched for, suggesting more user familiarity.
manageUse when referring to broad-based control, like managing permissions, access, or admin features. If using in the context of editing or updating a specific feature or item, use 'edit'.
newAvoid when referring to generating a new item. Use 'create' instead. Use when referencing time or software versions.
next toAvoid using directional language. It's confusing when read by a screenreader and is difficult for localization.
nextUse for a process or workflow to refer moving forwards.
offUse for when a feature or setting is not operating. This is the preferred term for a feature not functioning, because content best practices recommend simple, clear words. Consider using 'disabled' if 'off' would call comprehension or accuracy into question, or if the feature prevents a broader feature from functioning.
OKUse instead of 'okay'.
old, olderTo refer to an old version of software, feature, or item (like a Journey), use 'previous'.
onUse for when a feature or setting is operating. This is the preferred term for a feature functioning, because content best practices recommend simple, clear words. Consider using 'enabled' if 'on' would call comprehension or accuracy into question, or if the feature allows a larger feature to function.
openUse for opening a file, app, programs, etc. Avoid 'launch' or 'start'.
ourUsing 'our' when referring to Twilio is okay for in-product content. Avoid in technical documentation.
pickAvoid. Use 'select' instead.
pleaseAvoid except when asking the user to do something particularly inconvenient. It can give the impression that something is optional.
previousAvoid in cases of a workflow or process. Use 'back' instead.
quitAvoid. Unique to Mac. Use 'close' or 'cancel', depending on the situation.
refreshUse as a call to action to ask the user to reload the page.
removeUse when the item is still available and/or the user can undo the action.
runUse to describe the action of executing a command or script. Avoid 'fire', 'trigger', and 'execute'.
selectUse when a user has to take an action in the interface. Select is device agnostic, and is also more inclusive for those using assistive technology.
simple/simplyAvoid. This contains a value judgement and can make users feel dumb if it doesn't feel easy to them.
sign in / sign-inUse to refer to using credentials to get access to a system.
sinceAvoid unless you're specifically referring to time. Use 'because'.
sorryAvoid except if something extremely damaging or inconvenient happened, like data loss. Otherwise, it can make errors sound worse than they are.
startUse when asking the user to begin a proces, flow, or device.
success/successfullyAvoid because it is almost always redundant. For example, instead of saying 'Your account was sucessfully created.' we can say 'Your account was created.'
team memberDon't use 'teammate' or 'team mate'
thank youDon't use when users completed something they'd do otherwise. Only use when we've asked them to do something extremely inconvenient.
uploadUse as a call to action when a user needs to copy data of the same format from a computer system into a Twilio product
utilizeAvoid. Use 'use' instead.
usUsing 'us' when referring to Twilio is okay for in-product content. Avoid in technical documentation.
viaAvoid. Use 'through' or 'with' instead.
warehouseDon't capitalize.
weUsing 'we' when referring to Twilio is okay for in-product content. Avoid in technical documentation.

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